Sexually Transmitted Diseases
STDs
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        Common STDs
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        Pregnancy Concerns
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        Bacterial Vaginosis
        Chlamydia
        Genital Herpes
        Genital Warts
        Gonorrhea
        Hepatitis C
        HIV & AIDS
        HIV Self Test
        Human Papillomavirus
        Syphilis
        Trichomoniasis
        Yeast Infections
        Condom Information
        Male Condoms
        Female Condoms
        Dental Dam
        Personal Lube
        Spermicide
        STD News


Health Information:

Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Learn more about how to prevent and heal your body from these diseases:

   Venereal Diseases
   Bacterial Vaginosis
   Human Papilloma Virus
   Anal Warts

Shaving Prevention
Prevent pubic shaving sores that lead to open gateways for STDs.

   Razor Burn
   Ingrown Hair

Pap Smear
Pap smear test can detect early signs of HPV and help prevent cervical cancer.

   Pap Smear

Vaginal Yeast Infection
Yeast infections seem to be only rarely passed from one person to another through sexual contact.

A male partner of a woman with a yeast infection usually will have no symptoms, but some men may get an itchy rash on the penis.

   Vaginal Yeast Infection

 

Warning about Spermicide (Nonoxynol-9)

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STD sexually transmitted diseases
Learn about the dangers of spermicide.


Spermicide Nonoxynol-9

In the past, public health experts recommended using condoms combined with Nonoxynol-9 (N-9), a spermicide, for increased protection against pregnancy, HIV, and STDs. Two recent studies, however, call into question the effectiveness and safety of N-9.

A study published by UNAIDS found that N-9 used without condoms was ineffective against HIV transmission. This study actually showed some evidence that N-9 increased the risk of HIV infection.

Researchers note that this study was conducted among commercial sex workers in Africa who are at increased risk and used a N-9 gel on a frequent basis. The adverse effects might not be seen at the same level among women who are using N-9 less frequently or in a different formulation.

As a result of this study, however, the CDC concluded that given that N-9 has been proven ineffective against HIV transmission, the possibility of risk, with no benefit, indicates that N-9 should not be recommended as an effective means of HIV-prevention.

A similar study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that N-9, when used with condoms, did not protect women from the bacteria that causes Gonorrhea and Chlamydia infection any better than condoms used alone.

 

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