Sexually Transmitted Diseases
STDs
        What are STDs
        Common STDs
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        Preventing STDs
        I Have STDs
        Pregnancy Concerns
        Treatments for STDs
        Bacterial Vaginosis
        Chlamydia
        Genital Herpes
        Genital Warts
        Gonorrhea
        Hepatitis C
        HIV & AIDS
        HIV Self Test
        Human Papillomavirus
        Syphilis
        Trichomoniasis
        Yeast Infections
        Condom Information
        Male Condoms
        Female Condoms
        Dental Dam
        Personal Lube
        Spermicide
        STD News


Health Information:

Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Learn more about how to prevent and heal your body from these diseases:

   Venereal Diseases
   Bacterial Vaginosis
   Human Papilloma Virus
   Anal Warts

Shaving Prevention
Prevent pubic shaving sores that lead to open gateways for STDs.

   Razor Burn
   Ingrown Hair

Pap Smear
Pap smear test can detect early signs of HPV and help prevent cervical cancer.

   Pap Smear

Vaginal Yeast Infection
Yeast infections seem to be only rarely passed from one person to another through sexual contact.

A male partner of a woman with a yeast infection usually will have no symptoms, but some men may get an itchy rash on the penis.

   Vaginal Yeast Infection

 

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what are sexually transmitted diseases
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How can I keep from getting STDs?

There are things you can do to protect yourself from STDs:

  • The best way to prevent any STD is to practice abstinence (don't have sex). Delaying having sex for the first time is another way to reduce your chances of getting an STD. Studies show that the younger people are when having sex for the first time, the more likely it is that they will get an STD. The risk of getting an STD also becomes greater over time, as the number of a person's sex partners increases.

  • Have a sexual relationship with one partner who doesn't have any STDs, where you are faithful to each other (meaning that you only have sex with each other and no one else).

  • Practice "safer sex." This means protecting yourself with a condom EVERY time you have vaginal, anal, or oral sex.

    For vaginal sex, use a latex male condom or a female polyurethane condom. For anal sex, use a latex male condom. If needed, use only water based lubricants with male and female condoms. For oral sex, use a dental dam - a device used by dentists, made out of a rubbery material, that you place over the opening to the vagina before having oral sex. If you don't have a dental dam, you can cut an unlubricated male condom open and place it over the opening to the vagina.

    Even though it may be embarrassing, if you don't know how to use a male or female condom, talk to your health care provider. The biggest reason condoms don't work is because they are not used correctly.

  • Be aware that condoms don't provide complete protection against STDs. But, they do decrease your chances of getting an STD. Know also that other methods of birth control, like birth control pills, shots, implants, or diaphragms don't protect you from STDs. If you use one of these methods, be sure to also use a condom every time you have sex.

  • Limit your number of sexual partners. Your risk of getting an STD increases with the number of partners you have.

  • Don't share needles or drug injection equipment. This includes illegal drugs like heroin and cocaine and legal drugs like steroids and vitamins. If you get a tattoo or body piercing, make sure the needles are sterile (clean).

  • Learn how to talk with your partner about STDs and using condoms. It's up to you to make sure you are protected. The organizations in the "For more information" at the end of this FAQ have tips for talking with your partner. You can also talk with your health care provider about this.

  • When you are sexually active, especially if you have more than one partner, get regular exams for STDs from a health care provider. Many tests for STDs can be done during an exam. And, the earlier an STD is found, the easier it is to treat.

  • Learn the common symptoms of STDs. Seek medical help right away if you think you may have an STD.

  • Don't douche. Douching removes some of the normal bacteria in the vagina that protects you from infection. This can increase your risk for getting some STDs.